The loves of the artists jones jonathan. Nonfiction: The Loves of the Artists by Jonathan Jones 2019-03-24

The loves of the artists jones jonathan Rating: 5,6/10 1524 reviews

The Loves of the Artists : Jonathan Jones : 9780857203205

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

Does the broken column in the middle background suggest impotence or security? A sweeping, epic history of the Renaissance artists, seen through the lens of something that perhaps occupied their thoughts and influenced their art the most…sex. The introduction of Northern European artists, intrigued by the works produced in Venice and displayed proudly, even in churches there, shows the reach of the Renaissance, and how much it worked to change European culture. A sweeping, epic history of the Renaissance artists, seen through the lens of something that perhaps occupied their thoughts and influenced their art the most. Jonathan argues that the famous nudes of Michelangelo and Titian are not abstract images of ideal beauty, but erotic expressions of love and desire; and that in order to understand the Renaissance, we have to understand the sex lives of the men and women who defined it - men like Raphael, who obsessively painted his lover La Fornarina in the nude, Michelangelo, who made beautiful drawings of naked male bodies to present to the young man he adored, and Rembrandt, whose bedroom portraits of Hendrickje Stoffels are the frankest expressions of love anywhere in art. Jonathan argues that the famous nudes of Michelangelo and Titian are not abstract images of ideal beauty, but erotic expressions of love and desire; and that in order to understand the Renaissance, we have to understand the sex lives of the men and women who defined it - men like Raphael, who obsessively painted his lover La Fornarina in the nude, Michelangelo, who made beautiful drawings of naked male bodies to present to the young man he adored, and Rembrandt, whose bedroom portraits of Hendrickje Stoffels are the frankest expressions of love anywhere in art.

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Jonathan Jones: The Love Of The Artists

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

Taking Donatello's provocative reinvention of the nude as his starting point, Jonathan shows how the story of the Renaissance is the story of a sexual revolution. A sweeping, epic history of the Renaissance artists, seen through the lens of something that perhaps occupied their thoughts and influenced their art the most. A pimp or a protector? Confident female sexuality was also working its way up the social scale. Leonardo da Vinci, Caravaggio, Donatello, and Titian are examined here, amongst many others, within the Medici-led cultures of Italy. Painters and sculptors became the first sexual celebrities. For example as many lovers as some of them have, or despite their love of mythological scenes they are devout Christians. Indeed, the portrayal of the church, the patrons, and the Medici family in cities such as Venice, Florence, and Rome reveals the desire of the onlooker for more works.

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Nonfiction: The Loves of the Artists by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

. And yet the expression on that lovely face, which can only be from the life, is not that of a chattel. Sweeping from its origins in Florence in the mid-15th century to its culmination in the work of Rubens and Rembrandt in the 17th, The Loves of the Artistsshows that the Renaissance invented eroticism as we know it, and that the new ways of thinking about sex it engendered are crucial to understanding not only art but European culture as a whole. Taking Donatello's provocative reinvention of the nude as his starting point, Jonathan shows how the story of the Renaissance is the story of a sexual revolution. This blurring of the mercantile and the divine happens constantly in Titian's work. When Raphael paints his Baker's Daughter, La Fornarina, he is not just rendering a beautiful woman, but making her both his and available to all.

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The Loves of the Artists : Jonathan Jones : 9780857203205

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

The title comes from Vasari's 1550 Lives Of The Sculptors, Architects And Painters From Cimabue To Our Own Time, better known in English as The Lives Of The Artists and still the best book about art and artists ever written. Sweeping from its origins in Florence in the mid-15th century to its culmination in the work of Rubens and Rembrandt in the 17th, The Loves of the Artists shows that the Renaissance invented eroticism as we know it, and that the new ways of thinking about sex it engendered are crucial to understanding not only art but European culture as a whole. Who or what she is has never been established, though the lightning flash overhead suggests tension and danger. The great artists of the 15th and 16th century w A sweeping, epic history of the Renaissance artists, seen through the lens of something that perhaps occupied their thoughts and influenced their art the most…sex. Want something slightly salacious but scholarly too? It also affords an intriguing exercise in picture-cropping, something we are more alert to in a photographic age.

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The Loves of the Artists eBook by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

Those soft colonnades were once as taste-free as the Playboy Mansion and echoed to shrieking girls being chased by middle-aged and overweight Silenuses. The great artists of the 15th and 16th century were not just visionaries, but lovers. Sweeping from its origins in Florence in the mid-15th century to its culmination in the work of Rubens and Rembrandt in the 17th, The Loves of the Artists shows that the Renaissance invented eroticism as we know it, and that the new ways of thinking about sex it engendered are crucial to understanding not only art but European culture as a whole. Just what is going on? The image of Venus can represent in some works a powerful female body of startling wonder and romance, whilst in others she is coy and enticing, sinful and beguiling. These different parts of their personality can often co existed well together. Any attempt to eroticise or sexualise a subject and the grander the subject the higher the risk can often read like an attempt to debunk or reduce to the merely human or mere dirty-mindedness.

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The loves of the artists: Art and Passion in the Renaissance by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

The engine of the Renaissance was the rediscovery of ancient Greece and Rome, but the truly exciting thing about the classical world was that far from being cool, rational and artfully distressed, it was as gaudy and lascivious as the present. Michelangelo's driving, unrequited passion can hardly be missed, as even the Vatican recognises. Jones has a more developed, more historical and more interesting thesis. These different parts of their personality can often co existed well together. His Mary Magdalene, from about 1535, is explicitly the patron saint of prostitutes.

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The Loves of the Artists eBook by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

The interest, then, is not so much in finding the sex in the picture as in redefining art as itself an erotic activity. Henry James's feminine eye recognised something in Bronzino's stunning Lucrezia Panciatichi from around 1541. And yet her expression is also sincerely penitent. One of the earliest, most important, and ambiguous, pictures described is Giorgione's The Tempest, from the first decade of the 16th century. Joan Didion debunked orthodox classicism in her brilliant essay on the Getty Museum. And it is as always a joy to read about how art is born and is often seen differently in different eras.

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The Loves of the Artists: Art and Passion in the Renaissance by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

My personal theory is that this is a subversive and almost blasphemous version of that quasi-Biblical subject, a favourite for painters, The Rest On The Flight Into Egypt, which arranges the Holy Family in various ambiguous landscapes; but no angel in this one. I once read a very serious academic study that managed to make two somewhat later artists, Watteau and Fragonard, sound like the Paul Raymond and Larry Flynt of their day, pornographers for hire. The influence of the Mediterranean Renaissance on the colder climes of Northern Europe are also explored, as the lusty passions of one culture served to awaken the cooler hearts of another. Jonathan Jones has taken permission to copy the original's blend of biography, criticism, anecdote and sheer invention. There is a theory that he might belong to some guild of bachelors, but we know too little about that to judge what it might connote. The dirty fingernails, the exposed shoulders, the unravelling plaits, the bountiful flowers, the rotting fruit, the crumpled linen, the soft gaze of the eye, the upturned head, and the knowing smile, may all be easily passed by — but on closer inspection reveal the deeper desires of the artist.

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The Loves of the Artists: Art and Passion in the Renaissance by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

For example as many lovers as some of them have, or despite their love of mythological scenes they are devout Christians. This is the book you need. The Loves of the Artists is a sumptuous work, beautifully written, with learned insights into the more lustful inspirations hiding within some of the most dazzling artworks in history. The woman looks at us — for help? The great artists of the 15th and 16th century were not just visionaries, but lovers. How something can be radical when it is made be ordinary 300 years later of the other way around of course.

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Nonfiction: The Loves of the Artists by Jonathan Jones

the loves of the artists jones jonathan

These were advertising hoardings as well as masturbatory objects. The constantly shifting acceptance of sex versus faith is shown clearly here, whether or not you are familiar with the time period portrayed. His name is inscribed on her arm band. A banished prostitute or fallen woman, dealing awkwardly with the consequences of sexuality? This book was not what I had expected, but this is not a bad thing, because I love the humanity of it. A more Marxist historian than Jones might have highlighted this aspect more, but it jingles on every page.

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